Angel Yeast launches yeast probiotic for diarrhoea treatment

The product is designed to treat diarrhoea and strengthen healthy digestive and immune systems in children and adults

Angel Yeast, a high-tech yeast company in China, has developed a strain of yeast probiotic, Saccharomyces boulardii Bld-3 (S. boulardii Bld-3), and a production technology for the product. The product is designed to treat diarrhoea and strengthen healthy digestive and immune systems in children and adults.

"Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) is a kind of probiotic that has been considered a crucial nutritional intervention in treating diarrhea. The new strain of yeast probiotic developed by Angel Nutrition & Health Technical Center, S. boulardii Bld-3, is another ground-breaking addition to the S. boulardii family that has been proven effective in speeding up recovery from acute diarrhea and is beneficial to intestinal health in the long term," said Dr Zhang Yan, CTO of Angel Nutritech.

COVID-19 has prompted more people to pay attention to their health, the company suggests, with an increased focus on precautionary measures and healthcare products that prevent diseases and support their immune systems.

The use of S. boulardii for management of adult and children with diarrhoea is regularly prescribed by doctors and gastroenterologists and its efficacy for combating an array of gastrointestinal conditions is well documented in medical literature, Angel Yeast claims. A study published in the Chinese Journal of Pediatrics concluded certain types of probiotics, including S.boulardii can reduce the severity and duration of diarrhoea.

S. boulardii Bld-3 is developed using a low-temperature fluidised bed process. The company's protection technology allows it to form a dense shell that encloses active yeast probiotics inside. This process strengthens the yeast's resistance to gastric acid and bile salts, enabling it to be applied in various probiotic products.

Thanks to the larger size of yeast probiotics, the company says, they are more likely to form a space-occupying effect in the intestinal tract and are resistant to antibiotics.

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