Pioneering vitamin D oral spray to combat seasonal affective disorder

Scientific research has found that intraoral vitamin sprays are much better at boosting your vitamin D levels than their tablet equivalents

A revolutionary vitamin D oral spray by health pioneers BetterYou can provide the solution to boosting low vitamin D levels in the blood that are associated with seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

A study by Illinois psychiatric healthcare treatment centre, Yellowbrick, highlights a lack of sunlight and vitamin D as contributing factors with the disorder and also showed that SAD sufferers may have other depressive conditions.

According to the Office for National Statistics, 10% of the UK population suffers from depression, with numbers peaking between December and February when SAD is most prevalent.

Andrew Thomas, founder and Managing Director at BetterYou, said: 'Many people think the winter blues are normal, but SAD is a major depressive syndrome with clinical manifestations. In the past, SAD has been treated using antidepressant medication, however the most effective treatment has found to be exposure to equatorial sunlight, bright light therapy or intensive vitamin D supplementation.'

'By taking just one spray a day of one of our DLux oral sprays, many health conditions and diseases associated with vitamin D deficiency could be avoided.'

BetterYou’s DLux oral vitamin D spray range is listed in the NHS recommended product guide for vitamin D supplementation and comes in different strengths for people of all ages.

Symptoms of SAD include low mood and depression, over-sleeping, craving carbohydrates, sweet, starchy foods, and lethargy and fatigue.

Scientific research has found that intraoral vitamin sprays are much better at boosting your vitamin D levels than their tablet equivalents.

Participants taking BetterYou DLux 1000 vitamin D oral spray for 30 days saw produced a 53% greater absorption than those taking a branded vitamin D tablet supplement of the same strength.

The study by scientists in Athens, also found that people with low levels of vitamin D before the study started saw much bigger increases in their levels than people who already had high vitamin D levels.

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